• Fredericksburg residents Troy and Clinton Klaerner examine a map provided by contractors, Texas Depart-ment of Transportation of-ficials and members of the Gillespie County Relief Route Task Force. During the public meeting held Thursday, hundreds of citi-zens and landowners were able to voice their opinions about the proposed route through surveys, maps and conversation. — Standard-Radio Post/McKenzie Moellering
  • Fredericksburg residents Troy and Clinton Klaerner examine a map provided by contractors, Texas Depart-ment of Transportation of-ficials and members of the Gillespie County Relief Route Task Force. During the public meeting held Thursday, hundreds of citi-zens and landowners were able to voice their opinions about the proposed route through surveys, maps and conversation. — Standard-Radio Post/McKenzie Moellering

Relief route is nearer

Public gets change to comment on pros, cons of potential loop routes

Citizens of Fredericksburg need relief and after almost 30 years, it seems as if the end is in sight.

A public meeting was held Thursday, May 31 at the Hill Country University to give the community an opportunity to voice their opinion during a come-and-go event in regard to a prospective relief route for U.S. Highway 290, the town’s main thoroughfare.

Over 400 landowners, 11 members from the Gillespie County Relief Route Task Force, Gillespie County and 20 staff members from the project team collaborated to discuss the project.

The proposed route would take drivers around Fredericksburg on U.S. 290 rather than driving down Main Street.

“It is estimated that from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., a large truck drives down Main Street every 45 to 50 seconds,” a City of Fredericksburg flyer stated.  

Gillespie County Commissioner Pct. 4 and member of the Relief Route Committee Donnie Schuch, said that the biggest purpose of the route is to eliminate congestion.

“In addition to congestion and funding, I think we need to have access to the route wherever we are. It shouldn’t be something that is hard to get to,” Schuch said.

 

The meeting

During the evening, citizens, landowners and officials had the chance to collaborate and voice concerns.

“We hope that people give us the good, the bad and the ugly, so eventually, we can get to a final decision,” Schuch said.

Lea Feuge, public information officer for the City of Fredericksburg, stated that a come-and-go meeting allows people to come when they want, stay for as long as they want, all while having their voice heard.  

“This is something that affects everyone in the community and the more voices we have, we can get a better understanding of what people want,” Feuge said.

Many spoke about preserving family land, while others expressed a need for a safer route.

Attendees were able to fill out surveys, read information posters and draw on maps.

“The public has to be involved because we will be the ones paying for it and using it,” Schuch said. “We have to come together and make a consensus and make sure what we do is going to last.”

Many circled their property lines, while others suggested avoiding dangerous roadways such as Deadman’s Curve on Texas 16 South. Still others drew their own version of the route.

 

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Fredericksburg Standard

P.O. Box 1639
Fredericksburg, TX 78624-4228
830-997-2155