Gillespie Life

Wed
23
Dec

Mexican food goes far beyond burritos

By JOHN DeMERS

 

The spirit of culinary adventure is, for most of us, hard to resist. That’s what inspired me to drive all the way to Houston this past week to eat Mexican food.

If this makes you think of your own favorite Mexican place around town (which I would surely love, too) and wonder what the heck is wrong with me, I’d better explain. I drove all the way to Houston to meet, interview and taste some special dishes created by three respected chefs from Mexico City.

Wed
23
Dec

Go ahead — Borrow a book

By Tyler Gaudin

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH APRIL LAIRD: https://vimeo.com/149689314

April Laird and her husband, Jeffrey, lived in Austin for 24 years before moving to Fredericksburg in August. Laird had seen Little Free Libraries all around the capital city.

Little Free Libraries are exactly what they say they are: mailbox-sized libraries that are open to the public to check out, trade, add a book or even just take a book from for the pleasure of reading.

Laird wanted to become a part of the movement.

“I kept seeing [libraries] pop up in our neighborhood, but I lived on a dead end street,” Laird said. “I thought ‘no one’s going to see my library if I put it up’.”

The Lairds then moved to Fredericksburg, and lucky for April, her birthday was coming up.

Tue
24
Nov

Gamer makes Guinness Book

Guinness Record Breaker Tristen Geren holds up his records he broke for Super Mario 3D Land and NBA 2K9 while wearing his Super Mario outfit. — Standard-Radio Post/ Scott Allen

By Scott Allen

 

                Tristen Geren is not your ordinary 18-year-old. The Fredericksburg High School graduate who now attends Texas State University in San Marcos has broken over 70 Guinness World Records, 19 of which still stand.

                These records mostly involve video games, although a few are non-video game related.

 

Guinness interest

After finding out about certain video game records through the website: challengers.guinnessworldrecords.com/, Tristen decided to give it a go.

“Tristen came to me and said, ‘Hey dad, I’m going to be in the Guinness Book of World Records’ and I almost didn’t believe him at first,” Tristen’s father, Tim Geren, said. “I think I just responded with ‘Yeah okay, son.’ ”

Tristen says he broke his first world record on the “Mr. Pimple” app on his Apple iPhone.

Wed
18
Nov

From France, with gratitude

Seven local American service members and five family representatives of deceased members received medals honoring them as Knights in the French National Order of the Legion of Honor Nov. 11 in the Nimitz Museum ballroom. French Consul General Sujiro Seam (far left, standing) presented the awards to (from left), sit-ting: Leonard Edwards, Darwin Harris, John Homrighausen, Paul Kent, Norris Miertschin, Milton Pehl and William Scott, and (standing) Seam, Daniel Heinemann, Gail Nielsen, James Grote, David Laney and Geneva Alexander. — Standard-Radio Post/Richard Zowie

By Richard Zowie

 

More than 70 years ago, countless men from Fredericksburg and Gillespie County answered the call and served in the American armed forces in World War II.

Some fought to liberate France among four main campaigns: Normandy, Provence, Ardennes and Northern France.

Many did not return home.

On Nov. 11, Veterans Day, the French government presented the 12 service members still alive or recently deceased with medals honoring them as Knights in the French National Order of the Legion of Honor.

First established by Napoleon Bonaparte in May 1802, the French Legion of Honor is the highest decoration bestowed by France.

Wed
18
Nov

From France, with gratitude

Seven local American service members and five family representatives of deceased members received medals honoring them as Knights in the French National Order of the Legion of Honor Nov. 11 in the Nimitz Museum ballroom. French Consul General Sujiro Seam (far left, standing) presented the awards to (from left), sit-ting: Leonard Edwards, Darwin Harris, John Homrighausen, Paul Kent, Norris Miertschin, Milton Pehl and William Scott, and (standing) Seam, Daniel Heinemann, Gail Nielsen, James Grote, David Laney and Geneva Alexander. — Standard-Radio Post/Richard Zowie

By Richard Zowie

 

More than 70 years ago, countless men from Fredericksburg and Gillespie County answered the call and served in the American armed forces in World War II.

Some fought to liberate France among four main campaigns: Normandy, Provence, Ardennes and Northern France.

Many did not return home.

On Nov. 11, Veterans Day, the French government presented the 12 service members still alive or recently deceased with medals honoring them as Knights in the French National Order of the Legion of Honor.

First established by Napoleon Bonaparte in May 1802, the French Legion of Honor is the highest decoration bestowed by France.

Wed
18
Nov

Home for the Holidaze

By Matt Ward

 

Thanksgiving is still more than a week away, but that hasn’t stopped Hollywood from looking ahead to Christmas as yet another home for the holidays film hit theaters Friday.

“Love, The Coopers” assembles a talented cast of all ages — from Alan Arkin to Diane Keaton and Marisa Tomei to Amanda Seyfried and Ed Helms — for a holiday themed family dramedy that finds a bevy of individually flawed stereotypes all seeking some form of love, acceptance and redemption.

The film follows the basic plot structure of the vastly superior “Love Actually,” which still feels fresh and cohesive more than a decade after its release in 2003.

Wed
04
Nov

Keeping it clean

Domingo Sanchez, commu-nity service director, adult and juvenile supervision and corrections, sits at his desk at the Gillespie County Courthouse Annex #1. — Standard-Radio Post/Scott Allen

By Scott Allen

 

Domingo Sanchez, Gillespie County community service director, adult and juvenile supervision and corrections, is partially responsible for the beautification of the community and surrounding area.

Sanchez supervises adults who have been assigned community service hours by all courts and juveniles, ages 10-16, who have been assigned community service hours by the municipal and justice of the peace courts, precincts 1 and 2.

The attitude Sanchez displays is shown throughout his work.

“He loves this community and loves what he does,” Gillespie County Judge Mark Stroeher said. “He is very passionate about trying to help the many charitable and nonprofit organizations in the community.”

Wed
28
Oct

Cancer recurrence doesn't stop hospital's long-time quality advocate

Debbye Dooley has worked at Hill Country Memorial for 30 years. She now sees through the patient's lens. — Standard-Radio Post/ Ken Esten Cooke

By Lindsey Bertrand

This October, Debbye Wallace Dooley will mark 30 years at Hill Country Memorial Hospital.

At 56, she worked for all four of the organization’s CEOs, seen it grow from 180 employees to more than 600, and helped guide it to national prominence with the recognition of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 2014.

For three decades, she’s worked to improve every aspect of patient care. And in 2013 she became a patient within the system herself.

“The symptoms were there,” she said. “I felt bloated and had back pain, but these are things women feel all the time.”

Throughout the summer of 2013, Dooley wore dresses while she ignored the persistent symptoms. In November, when the weather cooled, a simple wardrobe change made her realize something was wrong.

“One morning, I just couldn’t button a pair of pants,” she said.

Wed
28
Oct

Perception isn't reality

By Matt Ward

Steve Jobs was an innovator.

The man behind the iPod, iMac and one of the enduring beacons of the tech industry hasn’t been gone five years and Hollywood’s already on their second biopic about the enigmatic and fractured genius.

Two years ago, an independent feature with actor/model/Jobs-lookalike Ashton Kutcher as the Apple co-founder was released to little fanfare and critical derision despite a solid effort done in quick turnaround following Jobs’ death.

Recently, a much more ballyhooed film that focuses on key moments in his industrial years, “Steve Jobs,” arrived in theaters much to the delight of national critics and to the general shrugs of the general public.

Since the Kutcher version is — in essence — Intro to Jobs 101, this year’s effort is Jobs 401, designed to be a master class for those seeking to explore the complexities of a man that even his closest friends couldn’t completely relate to or understand.

Wed
21
Oct

Healing through faith, football

 It’s been a long, uphill battle for Christian filmmakers.

Their films, no matter how religious the movie’s message might be, will get labeled with the politically correct “faith-based” genre tag, an almost instantaneous death knell to the financial profitability of the project.

Sure there have been some exceptions to the rule — “Passion of the Christ” and to a lesser extent “God’s Not Dead” and “Heaven Is For Real” — but on the whole, these “faith-based” films won’t ever receive the development or marketing budgets that a major blockbuster would, limiting the potential for commercial success.

Sports films have traveled that same road, albeit with greater success, but much of that can be attributed to more swings of the bat. For every “Rudy” there’s four or five “Million Dollar Arm”-esque flops.

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