Gillespie Life

Wed
16
Mar

Quilters code: 'Have thimble, will travel'

Last weekend, I was putting things away in the tank house when I stumbled into the bases of an old quilting frame.

The four wooden columns with a flat top with a round hole and peg stand silent in the corner while the quilting slats hide in the rafters in the smoke house. And while they are probably not worth much, the memories they hold are priceless.

That old quilting frame was handed down from my grandmother and who knows how many quilts Granny and her friends hand-quilted on it over the years.

Granny always seemed to be piecing a quilt top or two or three. She was always sewing clothing for the family and as anyone who sews knows, where there is fabric, there will always be scraps.

She’d fold the scraps up nicely, sort them by size and color and store them in a large flat cardboard box, waiting for the day when there enough scraps and colors of each to start a new project.

Wed
09
Mar

Get his kicks with youth soccer


Midfielder Yahir Ramirez (left) takes the ball from Santy Villa as Jose Mejia and coach Abi Arias monitor the ball movements. — Standard-Radio Post/Scott Allen

By Scott Allen

 

Soccer can be seen in nearly every country across the globe.

Its popularity has been seeping into the United States for years and various towns across Texas have experienced this growth. With more interest comes an increase in players, coaches, teams and fans. This is what led to the Fredericksburg Lions Soccer Academy.

The Lions, a 10-man team of seven- to 10-year-old boys, was started last fall by Fredericksburg resident Abi Arias.

“The main goal is to get it growing and have something for the community,” Arias said. “Something where they can take their kids and have professional training.”

Arias, a 2011 graduate of Fredericksburg High School, moved to Fredericksburg from Mexico when he was a youngster. Growing up, Arias says he never had any sort of club soccer team, so he was inspired to start one.

Wed
09
Mar

'How the Pacific War was won'


Standing on a courtyard built with a to-scale map of the world to show the vastness of World War II’s Pacific campaign, National Museum of the Pacific War members and donors walk the grounds of the newly-refurbished Phase 1 of the Pacific Combat Zone. It is now open to the public. — Submitted photo

By Richard Zowie

 

One phase down, one to go.

Following months of construction, officials with the National Museum of the Pacific War opened Phase 1 of the Pacific Combat Zone to the public last week.

In three separate viewings, officials allowed the media, members and donors and then the public to see how the combat zone’s refurbishment project has gone.

Phase 1 consists of a two-acre indoor and outdoor exhibit and is now open and included on admission tickets for the museum. It has a new retail and ticket center, bathrooms, renovated TBM (torpedo bomber) and PT Boat (patrol torpedo boat) and an open plaza.

Gen. Michael Hagee (USMC, ret.), president and CEO of the Nimitz Foundation, said the $8 million project was designed to increase the educational impact of the museum.

“We wanted to raise the several exhibits out here to the same quality of the museum’s George H.W. Bush Gallery,” he said.

Wed
09
Mar

A film for creatures big and small

There’s something for everyone with Disney’s latest animated classic, “Zootopia,” which arrived in theaters Friday.

Kids will be drawn to the vibrant world of the film, where animals of all shapes and sizes co-exist in harmony, while behaving and working like human beings.

Parents get to revel in all of the subtle (and not so subtle) hidden jokes stashed throughout as the film goes out of its way to make “Zootopia” equally appealing for adults. For example, a large subplot of the film parodies Marlon Brando’s larger-than-life character in “The Godfather” and is one of the best comedic representations of the gangster classic ever.

“Zootopia” offers a complex world filled with an unlimited assortment of animals as viewers follow a young rabbit named Judy as she struggles to become, and later fit in, as a police officer in the big city of Zootopia.

Wed
02
Mar

Perfect weather for Harper 5K


“And they’re off!” One hundred seventy runners and walkers, a record turnout, took part in Sunday’s Harper PTO 5K. Proceeds benefitted the Harper PTO group, which aides education initiatives in the Harper ISD. — Standard-Radio Post/Ken Esten Cooke

Runners and walkers stepped off on Sunday afternoon as part of the Harper Parent Teacher Organization’s seventh annual 5K Run and Walk.

Held at the Harper Community Park, the event drew 170 participants.

Awards for overall male, overall female, overall masters and the top three finishers in each age group were given.

Joel Pelton was the overall winner in the male division and John Trolinger was the masters’ winner.

In the female division, Claire Lukacs was the overall winner and Monica Clayton won the masters’ award.

The top three finishers in each age group were also recognized.

Approximately 20 kids participated in the Kids’ Fun Run.

A picnic followed the race.

All proceeds benefit the Harper PTO.

Following are the overall and masters’ winners in the male and female division as well as the top three runners in each age division:

 

HARPER 5K RUN/WALK

Wed
02
Mar

Running in circles

African-American sprinter Jesse Owens is a more than a worthy candidate to be honored with a feature film biopic of his life story. Unfortunately, the new Focus Features film “Race” isn’t it.

This isn’t to say that Stephan James, the up-and-coming actor charged with bringing Owens to life on screen, doesn’t do a remarkable job in the role. James plays Owens’ inner conflict between doing right by his family and serving as an international spotlight to a greater cause with great subtlety.

His performance shows a long, prosperous career in film, but it is wasted by a lackluster ensemble and shoddy screenplay.

“Race” suffers most from the fact that director Stephen Hopkins and writers Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse try to do too many different things and fail to succeed at most of them, making “Race” a mediocre film.

At 134 minutes, the film sits about a half-hour too long for comfort.

Wed
02
Mar

Straight shooters

Twenty-one youth qualified to advance to state competition after earning high marks on Saturday at the 31st annual Gillespie County 4-H BB Gun Competition.

In all, 98 shooters in the first grade through 15 years of age took part in the contest held in the Show Barn at the Gillespie County Fair Grounds.

Competing in the contest were eight-year-olds in the third grade and up. First and second graders are not eligible to compete, only participate.

One of the highlights of the awards program on Saturday afternoon was the presentation of the Houston Brown Memorial Award to Jaci Spies, who finished the contest with 474 points.

The Houston Brown Award is given to the top scoring individual based on both shooting and test scores.

Three individuals were presented the Top Gun Award, which is based only on shooting scores.

Wed
24
Feb

Bridging the gap

Seeking to put a new twist on the Christian story of Jesus Christ’s death, the new release “Risen” focuses on the story of Roman Tribune Clavius and his search for Christ’s body, following the resurrection.

By centering the film around Clavius — an ardent skeptic — the plot allows the movie to appeal to a broader audience base and does not limit it to an evangelical message.

Joseph Fiennes, who played the lead in “Shakespeare in Love,” is methodical in his pursuit of the body of Jesus as Clavius. Fiennes brings a refined authority to the role and his stoic command is the most complex acting found in several years within the faith-based genre.

Much of the film feels like a TV crime procedural and has the plot structure of a typical serialized television show from start to finish.

Wed
17
Feb

FTC ventures 'Into the Woods'

By Richard Zowie 

 

The curtain will rise Friday night on an award-winning musical that’ll be performed for three weekends in Fredericksburg.

“Into the Woods” will run from Feb. 19 to March 6. Show times will be 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. on Sunday.

Tickets are now on sale for Fredericksburg Theater Company’s upcoming musical. “Into the Woods,” will be performed at the Steve W. Shepherd Theater, at 1668 U.S. 87 South.

 

‘Into the Woods’

Opening night of FTC’s production of “Into the Woods” will begin with a celebratory gala at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19.

A selection of local wines will be served along with a variety of hors d’oeuvres. The cost to attend the opening night gala is included in the price of admission.

Executive Director Steve Reily recommends that anyone interested in attending the opening night gala to act quickly.

Wed
17
Feb

FTC ventures 'Into the Woods'

By Richard Zowie 

 

The curtain will rise Friday night on an award-winning musical that’ll be performed for three weekends in Fredericksburg.

“Into the Woods” will run from Feb. 19 to March 6. Show times will be 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. on Sunday.

Tickets are now on sale for Fredericksburg Theater Company’s upcoming musical. “Into the Woods,” will be performed at the Steve W. Shepherd Theater, at 1668 U.S. 87 South.

 

‘Into the Woods’

Opening night of FTC’s production of “Into the Woods” will begin with a celebratory gala at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19.

A selection of local wines will be served along with a variety of hors d’oeuvres. The cost to attend the opening night gala is included in the price of admission.

Executive Director Steve Reily recommends that anyone interested in attending the opening night gala to act quickly.

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