Gillespie Life

Wed
30
Mar

Sleepwalking through cinema

By Matt Ward

 

There is no better film to snooze through this year than “The Divergent Series: Allegiant.”

Even the film’s cast and crew, sleepwalk their way through the third in the teen dystopian film franchise based on the books by Veronica Roth.

The latest movie finds rebellious teen Tris leading a small band of friends outside the walled compound of what used to be Chicago.

Their escape and journey beyond the walls should be compelling cinema, but nothing ever comes together in director Robert Schwentke’s lackluster film, based on the first half of the final book in the trilogy.

Shailene Woodley does a passable job as Tris. Her character is relegated to the background for much of the film leaving Woodley with almost nothing to do.

Much of the focus is given to Theo James, who plays Tris’ love interest Four, which proves to be the movie’s biggest mistake. James gives a mechanical performance.

Wed
30
Mar

Just keep swimming

FHS swimmers (bottom row, from left) Emma Dearinger, Katie Habecker, Elianna Ivers, Michelle Millhouse, Allison Young, Katya Walker, Lauren Smith and Payton Carroll. Top row swimmers are Jordan Santa, Cabel Crocker, Gra-ham Hammond (manager), Xinbo Tan, Will Shepard, Trent Bullion and Tait Herbig. (Not pictured: Clay Salazar) — Submitted photo

By Scott Allen

 

Getting in the pool can be done in two ways: you can either dip your toes into the water or you can jump right in. The Billies decided to jump in.

Wrapping up its second season of competitive swimming, the Fredericksburg High School swim team has controlled all channels of the pool since its inception in late 2014.

Head coach Lisa Bullion, who helped start the team with volunteer swim coach Robert Walker and USA swim coach Jeff Hammond, had wanted to start a team ever since she began teaching here eight years ago. She said the right combination of support and timing helped form the team.

“It was a long process to convince people the time was right and there was enough support and interest from the community,” Bullion said.

Wed
23
Mar

'Miracles from Heaven'...

By Matt Ward —

Jennifer Garner’s performance as a desperate mother searching for a way to save her dying daughter paces the uneven faith-based film “Miracles From Heaven,” now in theaters.

Based on the true story of a family from Burleson, “Miracles From Heaven” finds Garner as Christy Beam. Beam is a mother of three and devoted Christian whose faith is tested by the struggles her middle daughter, Anna, faces. Anna has a life-threatening and seemingly incurable stomach disease.

Despite the film’s many technical flaws, “Miracles From Heaven” offers a pure, sincere story with a redemptive third act.

Wed
23
Mar

Lost & Found

Relatives and friends of Fredericksburg resident Jean Krohn, right, helped her find long lost brother, Glen McRoberts, after being separated during the Depression era. — Photo by Rilda Woodward

By Sandra Lane —

In the depths of the Great Depression in 1937, four children were put in an orphanage in Urbana, Illinois, because their parents did not have the money needed to care for them. Of the one boy and three girls, the youngest was just two years old.

Eventually, the mother returned in 1941 to reclaim two of the girls and their brother. However, the youngest daughter had been adopted and never had any future contact with her siblings for more than 70 years, until last week. 

Fredericksburg resident Jean Krohn, 80, was reunited with her long-lost brother, Glen McRoberts, 85, thanks to the technology available through the Internet.

She said although she occasionally thought about her birth family, she had never wanted to track down or contact any of them because she thought they didn’t want her.

Wed
16
Mar

Panic Room(s)

By Matt Ward

 

New release “10 Cloverfield Lane” — dubbed a blood relative to the 2008 monster movie “Cloverfield” by producer J.J. Abrams — couldn’t be farther from its spiritual sibling.

The film falters in its final moments, when it abandons the visual and narrative structure that director Dan Trachtenberg has created. This results in a poorly sequenced, generic ending more befitting a second-rate horror movie. His insistence on tying this spiritual sequel back to its predecessor changes the entire tenor of the film — not for the better.

At its high points, the film evokes the best elements of a “Twilight Zone” episode and Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window.” Confined to small, terror-inducing spaces deep underground, “10 Cloverfield Lane” is a cinematic master course in paranoia.

Wed
16
Mar

Kites soar high at LBJ State Park

Wed
16
Mar

Kammlah ranks 10th in nation

Fredericksburg resident Sadie Kammlah, 13, recently competed in the U.S. Archery Junior Olympic Archery Development (J.O.A.D) Indoor Nationals being held across the nation this month.

 Kammlah shot Saturday, March 5, at Texas A&M University and placed first in the female cub division in compound bows. With that win, she is now currently ranked 10th in the U.S. rankings for her age division.

She also placed first at the Texas State Archery Association or TSAA State Championships. 

 

For more on this story, read this week’s print and online editions of the Fredericksburg Standard-Radio Post. If you are a print subscriber, your full online subscription is free. All you need to do is call 830-997-2155 to get a password. If you are not a subscriber, call 997-2155 or click on the ‘Subscribe’ button on the left side of the home page and sign up today!

Wed
16
Mar

Quilters code: 'Have thimble, will travel'

Last weekend, I was putting things away in the tank house when I stumbled into the bases of an old quilting frame.

The four wooden columns with a flat top with a round hole and peg stand silent in the corner while the quilting slats hide in the rafters in the smoke house. And while they are probably not worth much, the memories they hold are priceless.

That old quilting frame was handed down from my grandmother and who knows how many quilts Granny and her friends hand-quilted on it over the years.

Granny always seemed to be piecing a quilt top or two or three. She was always sewing clothing for the family and as anyone who sews knows, where there is fabric, there will always be scraps.

She’d fold the scraps up nicely, sort them by size and color and store them in a large flat cardboard box, waiting for the day when there enough scraps and colors of each to start a new project.

Wed
09
Mar

Get his kicks with youth soccer

Midfielder Yahir Ramirez (left) takes the ball from Santy Villa as Jose Mejia and coach Abi Arias monitor the ball movements. — Standard-Radio Post/Scott Allen

By Scott Allen

 

Soccer can be seen in nearly every country across the globe.

Its popularity has been seeping into the United States for years and various towns across Texas have experienced this growth. With more interest comes an increase in players, coaches, teams and fans. This is what led to the Fredericksburg Lions Soccer Academy.

The Lions, a 10-man team of seven- to 10-year-old boys, was started last fall by Fredericksburg resident Abi Arias.

“The main goal is to get it growing and have something for the community,” Arias said. “Something where they can take their kids and have professional training.”

Arias, a 2011 graduate of Fredericksburg High School, moved to Fredericksburg from Mexico when he was a youngster. Growing up, Arias says he never had any sort of club soccer team, so he was inspired to start one.

Wed
09
Mar

'How the Pacific War was won'

Standing on a courtyard built with a to-scale map of the world to show the vastness of World War II’s Pacific campaign, National Museum of the Pacific War members and donors walk the grounds of the newly-refurbished Phase 1 of the Pacific Combat Zone. It is now open to the public. — Submitted photo

By Richard Zowie

 

One phase down, one to go.

Following months of construction, officials with the National Museum of the Pacific War opened Phase 1 of the Pacific Combat Zone to the public last week.

In three separate viewings, officials allowed the media, members and donors and then the public to see how the combat zone’s refurbishment project has gone.

Phase 1 consists of a two-acre indoor and outdoor exhibit and is now open and included on admission tickets for the museum. It has a new retail and ticket center, bathrooms, renovated TBM (torpedo bomber) and PT Boat (patrol torpedo boat) and an open plaza.

Gen. Michael Hagee (USMC, ret.), president and CEO of the Nimitz Foundation, said the $8 million project was designed to increase the educational impact of the museum.

“We wanted to raise the several exhibits out here to the same quality of the museum’s George H.W. Bush Gallery,” he said.

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