Commentary

Wed
25
Mar

Beetlemania: He had the bug for vintage VWs

Growing up, most of my youthful peers went ga-ga over such automobiles as GTOs, Stingrays and any kind of souped-up truck. But on the other hand, I was enjoying the possession of the common Volkswagen Beetle (the original model, of course).

Yes, I loved the looks of the Mustang when it was introduced in the mid-1960s, but my family could only afford used VWs. But that was okay; during my tenure under Mom and Dad’s roof, we owned (and, therefore, I got to drive) three different Volkswagens — a 1959 made in the Old Country (complete with the Wolfsburg shield), a 1967 (first year of the 12-volt battery) and a 1971 Super Beetle.

There was just something cool and hip about the VW. It was a working man’s car; it was utilitarian, not fancy. And believe it or not, it was something of a chick magnet (if my wife is reading this, I’m only kidding).

Wed
25
Mar

Smith's EPA-related bill seeks open data

Whether you think global warming is a catastrophe in waiting or an environmentalist-led hoax, the science behind bills to combat warming should be open to the public.

In the wake of Sunshine Week, the national effort for open government and transparency, we, as open government advocates, highlight a bill by U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith. The “Secret Science Reform Act” (H.R. 1030) seeks to open the science used by regulators at the Environmental Protection Agency before imposing further rules on American industry.

We lean toward the need to do something, as more than 90 percent of scientific studies point to a sharp rise in greenhouse gasses over the past century. But even the most strident environmentalists should sense the need to balance environmental and economic concerns. Outlawing fossil fuels and believing wind and solar power could fuel our current electricity demands is not a realistic option.

Thu
19
Mar

Guest column: Legislators target horse racing

By Lane M. Hutchins

The horse-racing industry in Texas is under siege from a number of sources.

It breaks my heart that the political leaders in Texas have little compassion for this sport or its industry, which not only includes licensed racetracks but farms and ranches and the livelihood of many thousands of our citizens.

Gillespie County Fair Association has the third-oldest continuous race meet in North America. It draws horsemen and visitors from all over the state and is the only nonprofit race meet in the southwest. The profits go to a scholarship fund for the youth of this county.

This race meet was recently put in a precarious position by our own State Senator Troy Fraser.

Wed
18
Mar

No weatherman needed; signs of spring abound

Predicting weather has come a long way over the years.

Nowadays, meteorologists are able to predict a weather change far in advance of its arrival at a certain location.

Think back to the past couple of weather systems that have moved across the Texas Hill Country. By the arrival of the last system, the weather forecasters practically knew the exact time when it would be passing over the different towns and communities in the Hill Country.

Something that is relatively new is the fact that winter storms are now being named, just as hurricanes are in the summertime.

When I got up one morning and turned on the television, they were already broadcasting that we had had our high temperature of the day and it would be downward from there as the latest front was just entering Gillespie County.

Wed
18
Mar

'Sunshine Week' eyes your right to know

Sunshine Week was created 10 years ago around the birthday of James Madison, the father of the Bill of Rights. Sunshine Week this year is March 15-21, so you may have noticed our brethren at your daily papers promoting it as well.

The agenda of Sunshine Week is simple: To promote your right to know. Open government works only when public information flows freely.

Public servants are mostly good people with a great desire to serve. They just get into issues when they try to become the gatekeepers of information, failing to realize that every single thing they do (short of on-going police investigations) is and should be public information. One councilman in Maryland threatened to sue if his name was even printed in his local newspaper. He was rightly ridiculed beyond belief by that paper and on social media.

Wed
11
Mar

Daylight Savings Time spurred by two Texans

Were you late to church on Sunday? Can’t get to sleep at night? Have you felt groggy this week as you find your way to work in the still-dark morning?

These are the short-lived effects of Daylight Saving TIme (DST). A friend of mine wondered on Facebook at about 10 p.m., Monday night, “Would some lawmaker who keeps approving these time changes like to come put my two small children to bed? Now would be good.”

I have felt a bit out of sorts as well, but I am one who likes the additional daylight after work for sometimes squeezing in a couple of sets of tennis or getting some yardwork done (usually in that priority). And at our house, Fredericksburg Independent School District’s early spring break, combined with the time change, means our two middle school sons have lurked about well beyond normal bedtimes, and lay sprawled out on couches and beds until mid-morning.

Wed
11
Mar

Lessons in hospital's continuing success

Hill Country Memorial is at the top of its class, as witnessed last week by its fourth consecutive (and fifth overall) award of being named a Truven Top 100 Hospital.

That independent award — hospitals don’t apply for that recognition — is the result of a study of more than 900 rural hospitals in everything from patient satisfaction to their bottom line.

As Texas finds its way in the healthcare landscape, seeking to lessen its number of uninsured, our hospital stands out even more, because having a healthy rural hospital is not a given.

In the past five years, a dozen small Texas towns have lost their hospitals (and 45 across the nation), due to higher levels of Medicaid and Medicare patients and the declining level of federal reimbursements. Those problems are then compounded, because a community cannot realistically grow and attract new business without a viable healthcare facility.

Wed
04
Mar

Town of Alvin holds childhood memories

As I am faced with one glaring question: What should I do with any available free time?
Perhaps I should visit a place that I haven’t been in 20 years.
Houston.

More specifically, a not-so-little-anymore town about 20 miles southeast of the Bayou
City that my family and I called home from 1981-1983.
Alvin.

When my family and I moved to Texas from Kansas in 1981, Houston is the first thing I remember about the Lone Star State. We’d stopped for the night in Oklahoma (Ardmore, if I remember correctly) and then hit the road bright and early to head to our new home in Alvin.

I fell asleep and woke up and saw we were on a road called Interstate 45 on the outskirts of Houston. Traffic was at a standstill. I’d never seen a city so huge (and wouldn’t until 1986, when my family on vacation drove through Los Angeles). Dad explained to me that an oil truck had overturned and that we’d have to wait until the oil was cleaned off the road.

Wed
04
Mar

Public Schools Week: Vote for bond plan

Welcome to Texas Public Schools Week, March 2-6. We use this week to encourage voters to support a local bond issue and to continue to urge our state legislators to restore funding cuts.

Locally, we urge voters in the Fredericksburg Independent School District to support initiatives and improvements. Recently, a $16-million bond was called for campus improvements. This includes new classroom space, fine arts and gymnasium upgrades, security fencing and more. (See our Feb. 11 front page story for details.)

The FISD has long been good stewards of our tax dollars. And as FISD is considered a property wealthy district, calling these bonds helps make local improvements while lessening the amount it has to send back to the state to supplement poor districts. This works much like a deduction on an individual or business tax return.

Wed
25
Feb

Must be getting taller, 'cause I see my head

As I approach the golden years, my hair has been turning silver.

This is not a new discovery on my part, just a realization of the fact that Father Time and Mother Nature are marching on and I’m struggling to keep up. I’ve seen the “distinguished” patches of gray growing on the sides of my head for some time. But now, the gray has spread all over.

(QUESTION: Why is it when a man turns gray his hair looks “distinguished,” but when a woman encounters the same thing her hair is “mousy?” That doesn’t seem fair.)

I used to make a joke when I’d get my hair trimmed by telling the stylist to cut only the gray hair. Yuk, yuk. But now I’ve realized that if I were taken seriously, I’d have all my hair snipped off by the end of the session.

It seems that hair is a funny thing. Animals have hair to stay warm while we humans have it to trim, comb, style, frost, weave, fry into permanents, bob and shave off altogether.

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